Teamlab Planets in Tokyo: fish and dizzyness

Who wouldn’t want to queue for an hour in the burning sun in front of a museum? We do! On Saturday morning at nine o’clock we were in the subway for a day at Teamlab Planets. Here we were ‘physically immersed in an enormous art space’.

Reflection

“The boundary between the viewer and the work fades.” Quite vague terms, but after a while it became clear how the museum tries to make this happen. After scanning your ticket (yes, here too you will get student discount!) you are in a room where the rules are played on the screen. It’s not allowed to wear shoes and if you are wearing a dress or skirt, you can get a pair of pants. Why is that necessary? Because of the reflection, others might see what you have to hide under your clothes…

Fish

It’s not an everyday museum, because in the next room you’ll be in the water again and this time among the fish! Not a real one of course, they are projected. The amount of fish depends on how many people are in the room at that moment. How the fish move, also depends on how people walk around. A special experience, which is especially fun for children.

Towels

Teamlab Planets consists of four large spaces with different themes. Before you enter the first room, you walk through a dark, long corridor. Suddenly you’re standing in the water up to your ankles and out of the blue a waterfall flows down. Then a member of the museum staff is already waiting for you with towels to dry your feet, what a service! And then you’re ready to see the first part.

Dizzy

We walked through the last room in a rush. Literally everything around us was moving! The ground, the walls and the ceiling. People were lying scattered on the ground looking around them. We closed half our eyes and ran to the exit. Not only can this make you very dizzy and sick of vomiting, you have to be careful that you still make it to the toilet. Luckily it wasn’t that bad, but we decided to skip lying on the floor and staring at the ceiling anyway.

Teamlab Borderless

Despite the nausea, which was not that bad, this museum is a must during a holiday to Tokyo. Besides Teamlab Planets, you also have Teamlab Borderless. It comes down to the same thing, only Borderless seems to be even bigger. We thought it was a unique experience where you become part of the space (just look at the fish that adapt to you) instead of often staring at paintings or other art objects.

Teamlab Planets in Tokyo: fish and dizziness

Who wouldn’t want to queue for an hour in the burning sun in front of a museum? We do! On Saturday morning at nine o’clock we were in the subway for a day at Teamlab Planets. Here we were ‘physically immersed in an enormous art space’.

Reflection

“The boundary between the viewer and the work fades.” Quite vague terms, but after a while it became clear how the museum tries to make this happen. After scanning your ticket (yes, here too you will get student discount!) you are in a room where the rules are played on the screen. It’s not allowed to wear shoes and if you are wearing a dress or skirt, you can get a pair of pants. Why is that necessary? Because of the reflection, others might see what you have to hide under your clothes…

Towels

Teamlab Planets consists of four large spaces with different themes. Before you enter the first room, you walk through a dark, long corridor. Suddenly you’re standing in the water up to your ankles and out of the blue a waterfall flows down. Then a member of the museum staff is already waiting for you with towels to dry your feet, what a service! And then you’re ready to see the first part.

Fish

It’s not an everyday museum, because in the next room you’ll be in the water again and this time among the fish! Not a real one of course, they are projected. The amount of fish depends on how many people are in the room at that moment. How the fish move, also depends on how people walk around. A special experience, which is especially fun for children.

Dizzy

We walked through the last room in a rush. Literally everything around us was moving! The ground, the walls and the ceiling. People were lying scattered on the ground looking around them. We closed half our eyes and ran to the exit. Not only can this make you very dizzy and sick of vomiting, you have to be careful that you still make it to the toilet. Luckily it wasn’t that bad, but we decided to skip lying on the floor and staring at the ceiling anyway.

Teamlab Borderless

Despite the nausea, which was not that bad, this museum is a must during a holiday to Tokyo. Besides Teamlab Planets, you also have Teamlab Borderless. It comes down to the same thing, only Borderless seems to be even bigger. We thought it was a unique experience where you become part of the space (just look at the fish that adapt to you) instead of often staring at paintings or other art objects.

2019-10-17T09:00:47+08:00oktober 9th, 2019|

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